Articles Posted in Criminal Evidence

Michigan sex laws. To not run afoul of the statutory rape Michigan law, it is critical to review the Michigan “consent” laws. Every state enacts its own rape laws relating to the age at which a female can acquiesce to having sexual relations. Making the mistake of engaging in sexual intercourse can make that older person a sex offender

Michigan age laws. In various aspects of our lives, the Legislative branch of government has enacted laws that are meant to protect young people. An example of this is for laws controlling when teenagers can marry in the Great Lakes State, as well as when they can consume alcoholic beverages.

Michigan statutory rape laws. In Michigan, the statutory rape law is denominated “third degree sexual conduct.” Any person under age 16 cannot consent to have sex. Thus, the burden is on the other person to positively determine a sex participant’s actual age.

What to Know About the Sex Offender Registry in Michigan

When Is SORA Registration Necessary in Michigan?

In the past, many violations that would trigger sex offender registration were prosecuted under the old Sex Offender Registration Act (SORA) even when the violation was a result of a mistake, ignorance, or unintended violations. If this has happened to you, then you’ll definitely want to hire a Michigan sex crimes attorney to help. Here is some more useful information for you to know about SORA:

How Can a Sex Crimes Lawyer Near Me Help Avoid SORA?

A top sex assault lawyer can help you avoid the Sex Offender Registration Act (SORA) in many different ways. Before we get to that, let’s first talk about SORA, particularly the newest version of SORA in Michigan.

SORA, which is also known as the sex offender registration act, applies to most forms of criminal sexual conduct. If you are facing a sex crime allegation, then you are also facing possibly being listed on SORA. This is also sometimes called sex abuse. If you are facing the kinds of allegations, indecent exposure, you will need a criminal defense attorney well versed in this complex area of law to assist you minimize or avoid the consequences.

A recent news report outlines some of the circumstances surrounding the arrest of Michigan Democratic state Rep. Mary Cavanagh of Redford, and as true with many media outlet stories it seeks more shock than substance.  To help elaborate on substance, and dispel some myths and misunderstandings about drunk driving laws, this article addresses the following three topic:

  1. A second DUI arrest does not necessarily mean enhanced DUI penalties, driver license sanctions or conviction,
  2. Being unable to stand on one leg is only a part of standard field sobriety tests, and;

Now that you understand the plea bargaining process in Michigan and how to prepare for court when pleading guilty, let’s now consider exactly what happens in court when you plead guilty. During the plea taking process the court will be concerned with two things. First that you understand the constitutional rights that you are giving up by pleading guilty, and second, that you are freely, knowingly and understandingly admitting to and acknowledging that you have committed the crime to which you are pleading guilty.

To confirm that you are fully aware that by pleading guilty you are giving up all your constitutional rights associated with trial, the judge will ask you a series of questions almost all of which are answered by the single word “yes”. So, for example, the judge will ask you if you understand that you have an absolute right to trial, to which of course your answer is “yes.” The judge will ask you if you understand that pleading guilty you are giving up your right to remain silent, to which again, the answer is “yes.” There are sometimes a few “no” questions as well, such as “have any promises been made other than those stated on the record, to get you to plead guilty.” The answer to the question so certainty be “no.” Another no question might be “have there been any threats, compulsion or duress used to get you to plead guilty.” Again, the answer should definitely be no. Once the court is satisfied that you are freely knowingly and understandingly giving up or waiving all your constitutional trial rights, and that no promises or threats have been made to induce the plea, then the court will move on to a establishing the factual basis for plea.

What Is a Factual Basis for a Plea?

Michigan Criminal Defense Lawyer Explains Plea Bargaining

Attorney Patrick Barone of Barone Defense Firm is a criminal defense law firm near me that represents clients accused of sex crimes, whereby if convicted, they would probably have to add their name to Michigan's se offender registry (SORA).If you are facing criminal charges, the criminal justice system seem overwhelming. It doesn’t matter if you’re facing drunk driving, drug charges, sex crimes or white collar crimes in the State of Michigan, the same system of felony criminal procedures apply.

Many Michigan DUI charges and other criminal cases like sexual assaults, child pornography and drug crimes, are resolved through a process called plea bargaining. A plea bargain is what happens after your attorney discusses your case with the prosecutor and explains why it is appropriate to amend or reduce the charges you are facing with the court. Sometimes the reduction in charges to a lower criminal offense will lessen the impact on your drivers license and possibly jail time as well.

Most of the time if you are pleading guilty it is because your lawyer has successfully engaged in plea bargaining with the prosecutor. Consequently, preparation for court when pleading guilty really begins to take place almost as soon as you first hire your lawyer. Therefore, the total preparation will take place over several weeks or months, and sometimes even years before you are set to appear in court. At a minimum the following things should have occurred before you plead guilty.

  1. You’ve reviewed all the discovery with your attorney.
  2. You’ve discussed possible defenses with your attorney.

Criminal Defense Attorney in Michigan Explains Discovery

Attorney Patrick Barone of Barone Defense Firm is a criminal defense law firm near me that represents clients accused of sex crimes, whereby if convicted, they would probably have to add their name to Michigan's se offender registry (SORA).If you are involved in the criminal courts you might feel like you’ve entered an alien space. The lawyers and judges all behave differently than “normal life.” They also use a lot of words you may have never heard. Words you have used might be used in a new and different way. An example is the word “discovery.” We all know what the word means in normal life. But it means something totally different in the criminal courts.

Discovery and Burden of Proof

Whenever you pull out your firearm in Michigan, you are placing your future in the hands of others.  Unlike some states, Michigan does not prohibit an arrest or prosecution for the use of fatal or not-fatal force in self-defense.  This means that the police will investigate the incident, which can include questioning, collecting evidence, and possibly an arrest.  Whether criminal charges are authorized is a decision made by the Prosecutor, but most people are unprepared for what happens after the use of self-defense.  This lack of preparedness is dangerous, since any misstep or incorrect statement could jeopardize your legitimate self-defense claim and possibly lead to not only loss of 2nd amendment rights but your personal freedom and a lengthy prison term.

When can I lawfully use force or lethal force in self-defense?

Michigan has two laws that cover various self-defense scenarios. The first is the Castle Doctrine, and this law applies to the use of force inside your home or your place of business. It also covers the use of force to prevent a carjacking. Another self-defense law that applies inside your home if the Castle Doctrine is not available, as well as anywhere else you have a lawful right to be, is the Stand your Ground law. The Gun Crimes Lawyers at the Barone Defense Firm have written extensively on this topic, and readers are advised to look up these articles also. But just because the law says you can use self-defense in certain circumstances this does not mean you won’t be prosecuted.  This is because Michigan’s self defense laws provide a defense they do not bar prosecution. This means you could be charged with Homicide even if you think you properly acted in self defense within the bounds of Michigan law.

At the Southfield Freeway exit on Eastbound I-96, there is a large billboard selling Byrna Pepper Balls as a self-defense method.  The pepper-filled paintballs are fired by a launcher that is essentially a pistol-shaped paintball gun.  The billboard states, “Works Like a Gun, Without the Consequences.”  However, it misses the severe consequence that, under Michigan law, it is a 5-year felony to possess these cartridges.

Specifically, Michigan Compiled Laws sec. 750.224(1)(e) prohibits any cartridge designed to render a person disabled by the ejection, release, or emission of a gas or other substance.  The pepper balls are clearly a cartridge designed to disable by the release of a substance.  This easily meets the prohibition under that section.

The penalty for violation of this law is up to five years in a state prison or a fine of up to $2,500.00, or both.  That means, if you are convicted of simply possessing pepper balls, you can be charged with a felony.  A felony on your record would prevent you from ever exercising your 2nd Amendment Rights. This significant consequence is not well known and many gun stores in Michigan carry pepper balls.  Byrna will even ship the pepper-balls to you, making it as easy as possible to break Michigan law.

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